Last edited by Tojak
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of A study of productivity in academic women social scientists found in the catalog.

A study of productivity in academic women social scientists

Pamela J. Perun

A study of productivity in academic women social scientists

by Pamela J. Perun

  • 122 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Pamela Perun.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 80130
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationix, 254 leaves.
Number of Pages254
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3067131M
LC Control Number82164408

Social Scientists - What They Do The major social science occupations covered in this statement are anthropologists, archaeologists, geographers, and historians. Social scientists study all aspects of society—from past events and achievements to human behavior and relationships among groups.   "The only books in the top 50 published within the last 20 years are Robert Putnam’s Bowling Alone (), Amartya Sen’s Development as Freedom () and Etienne Wenger’s Communities of Practice ();" As a non-social scientist, I always encounter cognitive dissonance when seeing the value SS practitioners place on books (compared to peer-reviewed research .

Since , when Cole and Zuckerman referred to gender differences in productivity among academic scientists as a puzzle, sociologists have sought to explain these differences by incorporating primarily institutional-level factors.   Productivity Why Reading Books Should Be Your Priority, According to Science You're not doing yourself any favors if you're in the 26 percent of American adults .

Jonathan R. Cole (born Aug ), is an American sociologist, John Mitchell Mason Professor of the University at Columbia University. He is best known for his scholarly work developing the sociology of science and his work on science policy. From to he was Columbia’s chief academic officer – its Provost and Dean of Faculties. Women in Science: Maximising productivity, diversity and innovation Report prepared for the Federation of Australian Scientific and Technological Societies Sharon Bell with assistance from Kate O’Halloran, Jesslyn Saw and Yu Zhao October ISBN:


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A study of productivity in academic women social scientists by Pamela J. Perun Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Research Productivity of Scientists provides an important and unique take on the causes and perpetuation of the "gender gap" in the STEM fields, and provides a nice complement to the feminist science and sociology of science literature that documents and analyzes the relationships between gender, socialization, climate, and scientific by: 5.

For over forty years, social scientists have noted and puzzled over the 'gender gap' in publication rates of academic scientists. In this study, the author, Robert L. Fisher, argues that men and women scientists differ in their 'problem choice process' and that this difference may be behind much of the difference in publication rates.

Gender, Family Characteristics, and Publication Productivity Among Scientists Article (PDF Available) in Social Studies of Science 35(1) A study of productivity in academic women social scientists book with 1, Reads How we measure.

specialized in the sociology of science, however, research on productivity has been gradually restricted to samples of scientists. Such studies typically focus on limited numbers of specialists in one or a few scientific disciplines.

The research productivity of social scientists, for example, has been less frequently consid. In the United States, women tend to publish less than men do and to be overrepresented at the lower ranks of academia. This study examined the scientific productivity and career status of female and male psychology faculty in Italian universities.

Psychology was selected as a discipline because for decades, it has had a female majority among its doctorates. Italy was the case study country Cited by: This study examines the relationship between child rearing and the scholarly productivity of women in academia.

Using, first, recent data collected by the Carnegie-American Council on Education and a multivariate statistical analysis, we find that, overall: (1) women faculty publish somewhat less than men; and (2) there is no evidence that child rearing is related to the number of publications. Men, women, and publication productivity: Patterns among social work academics Article (PDF Available) in Sociological Quarterly 26(4) December with Reads How we.

The research productivity of scientists: how gender, organization culture, and the problem choice process influence the productivity of scientists. For over forty years, social scientists have noted and puzzled over the 'gender gap' in publication rates of academic scientists. In this study.

The Academic Mind: Social Scientists in a Time of Crisis Paul F. Lazarsfeld, Wagner Thielens, David Riesman Free Press, - College teachers - pages. Women’s Careers in Academic Social Science: Progress, Pitfalls, and Plateaus I.

Introduction Academic careers consist of a series of milestones: the doctorate, tenure track employment, and promotion through the ranks to tenured full professorships.

While several researchers. The study found women publishing fewer journal articles than their male colleagues -- and also fewer articles in high-impact journals, though the gap there was smaller.

Noting that "psychology is a social science discipline where publications in edited volumes still persist," Mayer and Rathmann found no significant gender difference in the.

Explores the impact of 18 factors on the variations in academic productivity (publication of books and articles) among natural scientists, social scientists, and humanists in academia.

Findings indicated that there was no single factor determing productivity levels. (AM). 1 A widely held statistic stemming from the study by Cole and Zuckerman is that female scientists are slightly more than half as productive as male scientists. If this sounds like the cent button (the symbol adopted to protest the gender gap in wages), you are on the right track.

Downloadable (with restrictions). Abstract There is substantial literature on research performance differences between male and female researchers, and its explanation.

Using publication records of social scientists, we show that performance differences indeed exist. However, our case study suggests that in the younger generation of researchers these have disappeared. Introduction. The academic world has been dominated by men for a long time.

However, the share of women in academia is gradually increasing. Worldwide female students nowadays even outnumber male students, with 55 % in the UK and USA and with 59 % in the Scandinavian countries (OECD ).And of the new entrance in European higher education about 55 % is female.

1 Figure 1. Social science can open up debate and give us a say in shaping our collective future. The social sciences developed as a field of study during the nineteenth century.

Social science helped people understand the consequences and application of the new technologies of the age, such as steam power.

Victor Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the University of Indiana at Bloomington, co-wrote a study finding that women “take care of the academic family” more than men by picking up more service duties. The paper warned that this is problematic for women because service isn’t rewarded in the ways that research is, even when the service is essential.

It is written for social science students, so scientists might be put off by the style – but please don’t let that stop you from giving it a go.

Physicists and engineers have told me they loved the book. Successful Academic Women in the Americas: Human and Social Capital Descriptors. Miguel R. Olivas-Luján, 1 Ann Gregory, 2 John Miller, 3 JoAnn Duffy, 3 Suzy Fox, 4 Terri Lituchy, 5 Silvia Inés Monserrat, 6 Betty Jane Punnett, 7 and Neusa María Bastos F.

Santos 8 A complex interplay of personal and cultural characteristics enables some women, and not others, to overcome barriers to. Gendered Citation Patterns across Political Science and Social Science Methodology Fields - Volume 26 Issue 3 - Michelle L.

Dion, Jane Lawrence Sumner, Sara McLaughlin Mitchell. This study investigates how scientific performance in terms of publication rate is influenced by the gender, age and academic position of the researchers. Previous studies have shown that these factors are important variables when analysing scientific productivity at the individual level.The justification for studying faculty research productivity is that it affects individual advancement and reputation within academe, as well as departmental and institutional prestige (Creameriii).

Publication records are an important factor in faculty performance evaluations, research grant awards, and promotion and salary decisions.Some of the study's findings include the following:** at all levels of education, hard work, perseverance, and focus, as opposed to natural ability, are the most important factors for academic success** committment and involvement of faculty are key to the academic and career success of women, minorities, and first-generation college students Reviews: 2.